GiveBIG for Bike Works!

Tomorrow Bike Works is joining more than 1,000 local nonprofits for GiveBIG to help make the Seattle area a stronger, more vibrant community. Your gift can make a BIG impact in lives of the youth and adults who need the transformative power of the bicycle.

Bike Works secured $20,500 in matching funds and we need your help to secure these funds!

A BIG thank you to our GiveBIG Bike Works matching pool donors: Larry Engel, Donna Sakson, Becky Chan, and Crispin Wilson-Olsen! These supporters doubled or tripled their annual gifts to Bike Works in hopes of inspiring you, their fellow Bike Works stewards, to donate as well.  Please consider joining Larry, Donna, Becky, and Crispin by giving a BIG gift of $125 or more to Bike Works!

Join Bike Works for a Panel Discussion on Bicycle Theft

Have you ever had your bike stolen? Do you manage a bike shop?

Help fight back against bike theft! Join us for a panel discussion on bike theft and indexing on May 16 at Metier.  The region’s leading experts on addressing bike theft will discuss the current state of the problem and what we can do about it.

Panel Discussion on Bike Theft & Indexing
Tuesday, May 16
6:30 – 8 p.m.

Métier, 1017 E Union St, Seattle WA 98122

RSVP Now >>

Panelists:
Bryan Hance, Bike Index
Brock Howell, Bicycle Security Advocates
Kendra Borzio, UWPD
Seattle Police Department
More TBA
Co-Sponsors:
Commute SeattleBicycle Security AdvocatesBike IndexBike WorksEvergreen Mountain Bike AllianceMétierSeattle Bike BlogSeattle Neighborhood GreenwaysSportworks RacksTiGr Locks

Show-up before 6:30 p.m. to get your beers and food and settle down. Listen to the panelists’ presentations for about an hour. Participate in a moderated Q&A for the last 20 minutes. Then stick around after 8 p.m to continue the conversation over drinks.

Earlier in the day on May 16, Bryan Hance of Bike Index, Brock Howell of Bicycle Security Advocates, and the Seattle Police Department will make a special briefing to the Seattle City Council Sustainability & Transportation Committee on bike theft and indexing.

Would your organization/business like to also co-sponsor by telling your e-newsletter list or social media followers about the event? Email us at brock@bicyclesecurityadvocates.org.

RSVP not required but very appreciated.

RSVP Now >>

Welcome Start Up Supporters!


Bike Works is hiring!

Bike Works is hiring!

The Bike Works Bike Shop and Warehouse are now accepting applications for both full and part-time mechanic and retail positions.  In addition to running a full-service repair shop, we fix and refurbish every type of used bicycle for sale.  We provide service to the diverse, dynamic, and growing, Rainier Valley and surrounding neighborhoods.  Bike Works promotes the bicycle as a vehicle for change to empower youth and build resilient communities, with an environmental stewardship and social justice lens.

Experienced applicants are encouraged to send a resume to Kellen@bikeworks.org or drop off a copy at our storefront in Columbia City. 

 

A Patch it Forward Success!

Thank you for Patching it Forward! By Patching it Forward, you are helping to cover the cost of 15 neighbors receive the tools & knowledge they need to be an empowered bike rider. Here is just one story of how your support makes a difference.

A story about Patching it Forward

[Image Description: A bunch of bicycles are leaning against a picnic table. The shadow of the person taking the picture is cast across the grass.]

“At Bike Works we do many rides with youth, some youth have their own bike and helmet others do not so we supply

them.  This may seem like a simple idea but at the heart of it, giving youth access to a bike and a supportive community starts breaking down barriers and opening people up to freedoms and opportunities they didn’t know were possible for them.

Street Burners, the name given to those who have completed a Bike Works mechanics class, go on organized outings to ride bikes, explore the city, and build community together. While on a taco ride, where we ride from taco truck to taco truck and eat food while exploring the city, one rider got a flat tire. It was

[Image Description: A person on a bicycle rides in with a bicycle tire draped across them. They are smiling, riding on a bike path with grass a residential neighborhood in the background)

a slow leak so they pedaled on to the next block where the first taco truck stop was.  I, as the staff leader for the trip, didn’t have a patch kit on me but thankfully someone in the group did.

We stopped at our first taco truck and instead of just one person assisting with the flat; the whole group pitched in to

help. One person got out a patch kit but the glue was dry, so another got out their patch kit, someone took off the tire and tube, another grabbed a rag and inspected the tire for any foreign objects while others took food orders as to not let the flat hinder our adventure.  After all was said and done we carried on our taco eating and riding adventure.

A simple incident but a beautiful reminder that we are all on a

[Image Description: Three youth have their heads bent over the rear tire of a bicycle. The bicycle is largely obscured by one rider leaning over and reaching down.]

journey and sometimes you hit an obstacle and feel deflated. We all need that friend with a patch kit to help us get back in our saddle and inflate us again. Youth are on a journey and have obstacles that they have inherited such as lack of access to funds, foods, transportation.  So a patch kit to me

means pitching in to help our fellow members of the community.  And I am grateful for all those people patching it forward and making experiences and growth possible.”


For as little as $3.84 you can Patch it Forward to your neighbors in need.

Did You Know? Biking Black History

Blog: Bike Underground Railroad Sign

[Image Description: An official plaque in the foreground reads, “A Gateway to Freedom. Many freedom-seekers coming through New Albany achieved their goal, traveling as far north as Canada. The Underground Railroad refers to a widespread network of diverse people in the nineteenth century who aided slaves escaping to freedom from the southern U.S.” In the background, a blurred bicycle rider in red rides down a paved street.]

Did you know there is a bicycle route that travels along the Underground Railroad – from Mobile, Alabama to Owen Sound, Ontario? The Adventure Cycling Association and the Center for Minority Health from Pittsburgh, PA partnered to develop this 2,100 mile route which uses the historic “Follow the Drinking Gourd” spiritual as a guide through America’s past and as an inspiration for cultural exploration and physical well-being.

#BlackHistoryMonth

For more information check out:

 

Class is back in session

Classes are booming at Bike Works. Check out the youth & adult class programs pages to learn about all of our offerings! All registration fees are available on a sliding scale.

[Image Description: Woman with short hair in a cycling cap stands in front of a seated group of adults holding a bicycle part in front of her. The class is out of focus, leaning in to see the bicycle part. It is dark outside the windows.]

[Image Description: A young man in a red shirt wearing a black shop apron holds a tool out toward a bicycle. Only the rear wheel of the bicycle is visible. The student looks focused, reaching for a wire with the tool. A wall of tools is our of focus in the background.]

Paving the Way: Black Women Bicycling

Marylou Jackson, Velma Jackson, Ethyl Miller, Leolya Nelson and Constance White. In 1928, these 5 African American women rode 250 miles – from New York City to Washington, DC – in just 3 days! What inspired this journey? Simply the joy of bicycling!

History doesn’t tell us much about their adventure. Once in Washington, DC they went sightseeing and paused to take this photo for a local newspaper.

Historian Marya McQuirter shares what she learned while researching the social history of blacks in D.C. during the first half of the 20th century for her dissertation on an episode of the Bicycle Story. We do know that one rider worked at the Harlem YWCA and another at the Sargent School of Physical Training. It seems very likely that they were in the forefront of promoting women and bicycling access. Thank you for helping to pave the way!

Listen Now

#BlackHistoryMonth

Check out some of these great organizations who ride together for simply the joy of bicycling!

You’ve heard of Pay it Forward

Now there’s Patch it Forward!

Not having access to the tools or knowledge to fix a flat is a significant barrier to your neighbors who rely on their bikes. You can be the difference between a neighbor getting where they need to go or being stranded with a flat.

#PatchitForward Means

Giving Self-Reliance & Confidence

#PatchitForward means celebrating the power learning to fix a flat. This is one of the first things taught in our classrooms because it builds confidence. It shows that you are capable of biking to wherever your legs can take you with the assurance that you can make it home again.

Promoting Sustainability

#PatchitForward keeps otherwise usable parts on the road and out of the trash. Rather than a one way path from department store to landfill, a patching a tube keeps useful things working as long as possible.

Being a part of something

#PatchitForward shows the importance of community. Help prevent someone from getting stranded by giving the tools and knowledge to fix their flat. It’s not about how much you give, it’s about being a part of something bigger than yourself.

 

“At Bike Works, one of the first skills we teach in any class is how to fix a flat tire. It may sound simple, but knowing how to patch a tube and replace a tire goes a long way towards feeling empowered and confident on the road.”

Shawna Williams

 

Make a gift in support of Bike Works programs & keep your neighbors rolling!